BOA401M3 : Microbiology
Course code BOA401M3
Course title Advanced Microbiology
Credit value 3
Core/Elective Core
Prerequisite Nil
Notional hours          Theory Practical Field visit Independent Learning
      30     26 10 84
Objective/s

 

  • Provide Knowledge on physiology, classification and genetics of  microorganisms
  • Impart knowledge on uses and importance of microbes in the environment
Intended learning outcomes

 

  • Explain some physiological and biochemical aspects of microorganisms
  • Elaborate the major differences and criteria used in bacterial taxonomy
  • Interpret the mechanisms of prokaryotic gene regulation systems
  • Discuss the microbial spoilage and application of production techniques of various foods
  • Apply microbial techniques in characterization of bacteria and in the determination of the purity of water
Detailed syllabus
  • Nutritional and environmental requirements of microorganisms, Microbial metabolism and energy release, Alternative modes of energy generation in bacteria, Chemolithotrophs, Photoautotrophs, Anaerobic respiration, Fermentation and fermentation pathways, Transport mechanisms in microbes.
  • Bacterial taxonomy, Systematic study of some groups of bacteria. Bacterial gene transfer methods, Gene expression and control, Lactose, Arabinose and Tryptophan systems, Two component regulatory system.
  • Microbial flora of food, Role of microorganisms in the production of foods and  beverages, Microbial  spoilage of specific foods, Food preservation, Water pollution and microbial indicators, Microbiology of waste and waste water, Water purification process, Microbial safety of drinking water.    
Teaching and Learning Methods / Activities Lectures, Practical, Tutorial discussion, Seminar and oral presentation, Field based studies, E-learning and online based teaching.
Evaluation Theory: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Practical: In-course assessment(s):30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Overall mark = (6*MT+4*MP)/10

MT – Marks for theory component, MP – Marks for practical component

Recommended References
  • Pepper, I. L., Gerba, C. P. and Gentry, T.J.(2015). Environmental Microbiology. 3rd ed. USA: Elsevier.
  • Madigan, M.T., Martinko, J.M., Stahi, D.A. and Clark, D.P.(2010). Brock Biology of Microorganisms. 13th ed. USA: Elsevier.
  • Kim, B.H. and Gadd, G. M.(2008).Bacterial Physiology and metabolism. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Glymph, T.(2005). Wastewater Microbiology. USA: American Water works Association.
BOA402M3 : Genetic engineering
Course  code BOA402M3
Course  title Genetic Engineering
Credit value 3
Core/Elective Core
Prerequisite Nil
Notional hours Theory Practical Field visit Independent learning
30 36 10 74
Objective/s

nes of interest

  • To impart knowledge on various cloning vehicles
  • To provide skills on recombinant protein expression and purification e
  • To provide knowledge on protein-protein interactions
 Intended learning outcomes
  • Describe the applications of genetic engineering
  • Differentiate the various vectors involved in gene transfer
  • Explain the role of DNA technology and its uses in synthesizing new recombinant products
  • Analyze the problems of protein expression
  • Discuss the ethical issues of genetic engineering
Detailed syllabus
  • Introduction to recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering, Enzymes used in genetic engineering.
  • Cloning vectors such as bacterial plasmids, bacteriophages, cosmids, phagemids, yeast plasmids, yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC), bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC), plant and animal viruses, transposons, shuttle vectors, and expression vectors.
  • Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Gene cloning in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, Expression of cloned DNA in the host, Detecting protein-protein interactions, Post-transcriptional and translational modifications, Strategies of recombinant DNA technology, DNA sequencing, Western blotting, southern blotting and northern blotting
  • Application of genetic engineering in plants, biosafety, Ethical issues in the implications of genetic engineering
Teaching and Learning Methods / Activities Lectures, practical sessions, field visit, tutorial discussion, assignments/presentations/group discussion by students,

E – Learning and online based mode of teaching.

Evaluation Theory: In-course assessment(s):  30%, End of Course Examination:70%

Practical: In-course assessment(s):  30%, End of Course Examination:70%

Overall marks = (6*MT+4*MP)/10

MT – Marks for theory component, MP – Marks for practical component

Recommended References
  • Brown, T. A. (2013). Gene Cloning and DNA Analysis: An Introduction, 6th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Reece, R. J. (2003). Analysis of Genes and Genomes; 
  • Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Power, C. B. (2013). Molecular cell biology, Himalaya publishing house.
BOA403C3 : Plant Virology
Course  code BOA403M3
Course title  Plant Virology
Credit value 3
Core/Elective Core
Prerequisite Nil
Hourly breakdown      Theory   Practical  Field visit            Independent Learning
30 26 10 84
Objective/s:  
  • Describe plant diseases caused by viruses and virus like organisms
  • Explain the methods used to identify plant viruses
  • Discuss the importance of plant viral disease management
Intended learning outcomes:  
  • Explain the concepts of plant viral disease development
  • Describe the molecular properties of viruses
  • Diagnose plant viral diseases based on symptoms.
  • Apply molecular techniques in virus identification.
  • Distinguish diseases caused by plant viruses from other biotic factors
  • Describe plant viral transmission
  • Discuss the measures to control plant viral diseases
  • Create awareness about plant viral diseases
Detailed syllabus
  • Overview of viruses: Virus structure: morphology, genome organization,  Properties used for characterization of viruses
  • Taxonomy of plant viruses; Symptomatology, Common virus diseases that affect crop cultivation in the globe.
  • Replication strategies of viruses; Transmission of plant viruses,
  • Functions governed by viral genes, Detection and identification of plant viruses: conventional methods, Nucleic acid based methods
  • Molecular characterization of virus genome based on modern techniques: Extraction and purification of plant virus nucleic acid, sequencing and analyzing PCR products, determination of molecular evolution
  • Movement of viruses in plants; Methods to develop virus free plants, Control measures of plant viral diseases: conventional and molecular level methods
  • Virus-like diseases in plants: phytoplasma, viroids, satellite viruses.
Teaching and Learning Methods / Activities Lectures, practical sessions, tutorial discussion, small group discussions, field-based studies, E – Learning and online based teaching.
Evaluation Theory: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Practical: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Overall marks = (6*MT+4*MP)/10

MT –  Marks for theory component, MP –  Marks for practical component

Recommended References
  • Agrios, G. N. (2005). Plant Pathology, 5th edition, Elsevier Academic Press.
  • Devika, M. De Costa. A (2009). Monograph on Plant viruses, , Faculty of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya.
  • Hull, R. (2009). Comparative Plant Virology, 2nd edition, Academic Press.
BOA404M3 : Herbarium, Seminar and Essay
Course code BOA404M3
Course title Plant Responses
Credit value 3
Core/Elective Core
Prerequisite Nil
Notional hours Theory Practical Field visit Independent Learning
          45      10 95
Objective/s
  • Impart knowledge on plant responses under various stress  and how plants survive under various stress
  • Provide knowledge of molecular biological approach on crop protection and improvement
Intended learning outcomes:
  • Describe various abiotic stress responses
  • Analyze various defense mechanisms
  • Discuss epigenetic program in plants due to responses
  • Describe environmental stimuli and physiological responses
  • Explain the developmental responses to climate change
Detailed syllabus
  • Introduction to plant responses, Abiotic stress responses (drought, heat, cold, salinity, heavy metal, mechanical damage); physical responses, molecular responses, biochemical responses, physiological responses and morphological responses,
  • Defense responses; Pre-existing and post infection defense mechanisms, defense against insect herbivores.
  • Immunization of plants against pathogens, defense through genetically engineering disease-resistant plants;
  • Epigenetic program in plants. Tropisms; geotropism, chemotropism, hydrotropism, thigmotropism, traumatotropism and electrotropism.
  • Plant developmental responses to climate changes.
Teaching and Learning Methods / Activities Lectures, field experiments, tutorial discussion, small group discussions, reading assignments, E – Learning and online based teaching.
Evaluation In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination:70%       
Recommended References
  • Shanker, A. K. and Venkateswarlu, B. (2011). Abiotic stress in plants – Mechanisms and adaptations. In Tech.
  • Agrios, G.N. (2005). Plant Pathology. 5th ed. Elsevier Academic Press.
  • Lincoln, T. and Eduardo, Z. (2002). Plant Physiology.3rd ed.Sinauer Associates.
BOA405M3 : Biotechnology
 Course code BOA405M3
Course title Biotechnology
Credit value 3
Core/Elective Core
Prerequisite Nil
Notional hours Theory Practical Field visit Independent Learning
30 36 10 74
Objective/s
  • Impart knowledge on how biotechnological tools are used in industrial applications.
  • Provide advanced skills and techniques for the commercial biotech tools.
Intended learning outcomes:
  • Describe the basic principles of biotechnology and plant propagation methods
  • Analyze various techniques in the traditional and modern biotechnology
  • Evaluate different applications of biotechnology in the production of bioactive compounds
  • Explain the ethical and environmental impacts of biotechnology
Detailed syllabus
  • Introduction to Plant Biotechnology, Transgenic techniques and transgenic plant regeneration andproduction, integration of DNA into plant genome by different methods, genomic and cDNA libraries.
  • Fermentation Technology, Fermenter, Microbial Fermentations, production of bioactive compounds (Acetic Acid, Citric Acid, Bioethanol, Antibiotics, Enzymes and Beverages), Applications.
  • Innate and acquired Immunity, Antigens and Antibodies, Immunoglobulins, Antigen-Antibody Interactions, Vaccines and bioactive compounds.
  • Bioremediation, biopesticides, biofertilizers, bioleaching, biosensors, bioindicators, biodegradable plastics, secondary metabolites of biotechnological importance, methods for crop improvement: herbicide resistance, disease resistance, novel proteins, Biological detoxification and hazardous waste management.
  • Industrial Biotechnology, single cell protein (SCP), Bioconversions – Biomining and bioleaching, microorganisms in industrial microbiology Bio-gas, Bio-leaching, biofuels (bioethanol and Bio-diesel), Technology and tools used in the enzyme production, Vermiculture.
Teaching and Learning Methods / Activities Lectures, practical, tutorial discussion, take-home assignments, seminar and oral presentation by students, field based studies, E – Learning and online based teaching.
Evaluation Theory: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Practical: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Overall marks= (6*MT+4*MP)/10

MT – Marks for theory component, MP – Marks for practical component

Recommended References
  • Das, H. K. (2000) Textbook of Biotechnology, 4th Edition, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.
  • Kapilan, R. (2019). Molecular Biology and Genetics, 1st edition, Biranavi Publishers.
  • Watson, J. D. (2014). Molecular biology of the gene, 7th edition, Pearson/ Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. 
BOA406M3 : Horticulture and organic farming
Course code BOA406M3
Course title Horticulture and organic farming
Credit Value 03
Core/Elective Core
Prerequisite Nil
Hourly Breakdown Theory Practical Field visit Independent Learning
30 36 10 74
Objective/s
  • Provide knowledge of cultivation practices in horticulture
  • Impart knowledge on organic farming
Intended learning outcomes
  • Interpret the concepts and fundamentals of plant propagation methods
  • Apply effective  methods for horticulture
  • Apply pruning techniques in commercial fruit crops
  • Describe recent trends in organic farming and pest management
Course contents
  • Introduction to horticulture: Growing environment, Soil media, Green house management.
  • Plant propagation in horticultural crops: Sexual propagation; seed collection, seed viability, storage and germination. Asexual propagation; cuttings, rooting hormones, grafting; budding and layering.
  • Fruit production: Orchard establishment, pruning techniques of fruit crops, harvesting and post-harvest technology.
  • Pest and disease on horticultural crops, Different irrigation techniques for horticultural crops and alternative and new crop production to Jaffna area.
  • Organic farming: Introduction to organic farming, Organic crops, Organic certification, Choice of crops, Mulching, organic compost, Organic fertilizers, Organic pesticides and marketing.
Teaching learning Methods/Activities Lectures, practical, tutorial discussion, take-home assignments, field based studies, E – Learning and online based teaching.
Evaluation/Assessment Strategy Theory: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Practical: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Overall marks = (6*MT+4*MP)/10

MT –  Marks for theory component, MP –  Marks for practical component

Recommended References

 

  • Chris Bird (2014). The fundamentals of horticulture.Cambridge University press.
  • George Aquaah (1999). Horticulture: Principles and practices. 4th ed. Pearson.
  • Dahama, A. K. (2007). Organic farming for sustainable agriculture.  2nd ed. Agrobios               
BOA407M3 : Independent study on Plant Science
Course code BOA407M3
Course title Independent study on Plant Science
Credit Value 3
Core/Elective Core
Prerequisite Nil
Hourly break down Theory Practical Field visit Independent Learning
  20 50 80
Objective/s
  • Provide skills on collection, categorization, identification, and presentation of plant specimens and writing essays various plant science related topics
  • Impart knowledge in the current aspects of plant science, Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Explore the current issues and findings related to plant and microorganisms
Intended learning outcomes
  • Identify the characteristics of various plant specimens
  • Demonstrate oral competency in presenting the current topics in plant science
  • analyze related topics in plant science
Course contents
  • Herbarium: Collection of lower and higher plant specimens from various habitats, Identification of plant specimens, preparation of herbarium specimens, maintaining a record of the herbarium specimens
  • Essay: Gain knowledge in various topics of scientific interest and express the knowledge in writing
  • Seminar: Scientific communication using the collected information on the current topics in biology, environment, energy, plant disease and related topics
Teaching Learning Methods/Activities Collection of plant specimens from various fields, standard tagging, wide reading on scientific topics
Evaluation/Assessment strategy Herbarium evaluation: 50 collected plant specimens : 30%

Seminar (panel) evaluation: 20%

End of Course examination: Writing essays on selected topics – End of Course Examination – 50%

BOA408M6 : Research Project
Course Code BOA408M6
Course Title Research Project
Credit Value 6
Core/Elective Core
Prerequisite Nil
Objective/s
  • Provide knowledge, skills to analyze, find a solution to a research problem, organize and present the findings
Intended learning outcomes
  • Identify a research problem
  • Review of literature using print and electronic media
  • Develop methods to analyze the identified problems
  • Collect the relevant data
  • analyze the data in a meaningful way
  • Apply the problem solving skills
  • Discuss the findings of the study
  • Compose the project report
Course Description
  • A research project on selected Botany related topics and shall be carried out under the supervision of one or more academic staff in the department. The duration of the project is 2 semesters in parallel to the 4M academic year. The student is expected to make a presentation half way through the project to monitor the progress.
  • On completion of the project, a research project report containing Title page, Abstract, Introduction and Literature Review, Objectives, Materials and Methods, Results, Discussion and References. A final presentation should be made based on the outcome of the research project.
Teaching and Learning Methods Library and laboratory work, field visits, software and internet resource application, consultation with supervisor, presentation (oral and poster)
Evaluation Methods

 

Mid-project Presentation – 15%

Final Presentation 15%

Research project report 70%

Recommended References

 

  • Myers, J. L. and Well, A. D. (2003). Research design and statistical analysis. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Cargil, M. and P O’Connor, (2003). Writing scientific research articles – strategy and steps.
BOA409M3 : Rhizosphere Biology
Course code BOA409M3
Course title Rhizosphere Biology
Credit Value 3
Core/Elective Elective
Prerequisite Nil
Hourly Breakdown Theory Practical Field visit Independent Learning
30 36 10 74
Objective/s
  • Describe rhizosphere and rhizosphere interactions, growth promoting and disease causing microbes in soil and their interaction with plants.
Intended learning outcomes
  • Make use of the techniques in plant pathology
  • Describe the pathogenesis of some soil borne crop diseases
  • Apply the skills in the production of bio control agents
  • Measure the biocontrol agents in the management of soil borne diseases.
  • Apply the knowledge in efficient microbial interactions
Course Description
  • Rhizosphere, rhizosphere microbiome and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, revegetating inert soils with the use of microbes, rhizobium, mycorrhiza and their roles in plant and soil health and  rhizosphere dynamics with forest communities.
  • Soil-borne inoculum, inoculum potential and environmental factors affecting disease epidemics, fungistasis and competitive saprophytic ability, definitions of some terms in pathology of soil borne diseases and pathogenesis of some soil-borne diseases.
  • Microbes and soil quality, Soil fertility amendments, Compost and vermicompost as amendments promoting soil health, C:N ratio of organic material and  soil nitrogen status.
  • Microbial interactions: Plant-microbe interactions, Microbial biofilm and Quorum sensing, Plant-pathogen interaction, Programmed cell death, Systemic Acquired Resistance and Induced Systemic Resistance, Microbial inoculants, Microbial antagonists in disease management.
Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, practical sessions, tutorial discussion,assignments/presentations/field visit by students, group discussions
Evaluation Methods

 

Theory: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Practical: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Overall marks = (6*MT+4*MP)/10

MT –  Marks for theory component, MP – Marks for practical component

Recommended References

 

  • Agrios, G. N. (2005). Plant Pathology, 5th edition Elsevier Academic Press.
  • Naik, M. K, Devika Rani G. S. (2008). Advances in soil borne plant diseases, 2nd edition New India Publishing.
  • Rangaswami, G. and Bagyaraj, D. J. (2014). Agricultural Microbiology, 2nd Edition, PHI learning (pvt.) Ltd.
  • Somasegaran, P. and Hobens, H. J. (1994). Handbook for Rhizobia. Springer laboratories.
BOA4210M3 : Food Toxins
Course code BOA410M3
Course title Food Toxins
Credit Value 3
Core/Elective Elective
Prerequisite Nil
Hourly breakdown Theory Practical Field visit Independent learning
45 10 95
Objective/s
  • To provide knowledge in categorizing various food toxins and describing their harmful effects
Intended learning outcomes
  • Describe the different types of toxins
  • Describe the characteristics of various toxins in foods
  • Express the effects of various toxins
  • Interpret the toxicity of various toxins
  • Analyze the toxicological risk assessment
Course Description
  • Biological significance of toxic substances, toxic and hazardous elements, agrochemicals, aoxic organic compounds, mycotoxins, natural toxic ingredients; plant origins and animal origins, toxin characteristics, classification of natural toxins, avoiding natural toxins, bacterial toxins, additives, toxic reaction products, toxicological risk assessment.
Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, presentation, tutorial discussion,assignments/presentations/laboratory visit by students, E – Learning and online based teaching.
Evaluation Methods In-course assessment(s): 30%,                                                         End of Course Examination:70%
 

Recommended References

  • Waldemar, M., Dabrowski, Zdzislaw E. Silkoprski. (2004). Toxins in food, 1st edition, CRC Press.
  • TonuPussa, (2013). Principles of Food Toxicology, 2nd edition, CRC Press.
  • U. S. Food and Drug Administration, (2012). Handbook of food-borne pathogenic Microorganisms and Natural toxins, 2nd edition.
BOA411M3 : Cell Signalling
Course code BOA411M3
Course title Cell Signalling
Credit Value 3
Core/Elective Elective
Prerequisite Nil
Hourly breakdown Theory Practical Independent learning
45 105
Objectives
  • To introducethe principles of cellular signal transduction pathways
  • To impart knowledge on different types of signaling pathways
  • To interpret the links between various signaling pathways

 

Intended learning outcomes
  • List the various signalling pathways
  • Distinguish various types of receptors
  • Assess the GTP binding proteins as molecular switches
  • Analyze the regulation of various signalling pathways

 

Detailed syllabus
  • Overview of signalling, Identification and purification of cell-surface receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors and their effectors, IQ motif containing GTPase Activating Proteins (IQGAP), receptor Tyrosine kinase and Ras, MAP kinase pathways, second messengers, interaction and regulation of signalling pathways, Signalling: from plasma  membrane to nucleus.
Teaching and Learning Methods / Activities
  • Lecture, presentation, tutorial discussion, assignments/presentations/group discussion, quiz, E – learning and online based teaching.
Evaluation In-course assessment(s):30%,

End of Course Examination:70%

Recommended References
  • Lodish, H., Berk, A.,  Zipursky, L., Matsudaira, P., Baltimore, D. and Darnell, J. (2001). Molecular cell biology, Fourth edition, W. H Freeman and Company.
  • Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K. and Walter, P. (1983). Molecular biology of the cell, 4th edition, Garland publishing.
BOA412M3: Applied Bioinformatics in Plant Pathology
Course code BOA412M3
Course title Applied Bioinformatics in Plant Pathology
Credit value 3
Core/Elective Elective
Prerequisite Nil
Hourly Breakdown Theory Practical Independent Learning
30 36 84
Objective/s
  • Describe the importance of bioinformatics in plant pathology
  • Demonstrate the DNA sequence analysis using bioinformatics tools
  • Describe the protein molecules involve in host-pathogen interactions
  • Explain various gene expression analysis methods
Intended learning outcomes:
  • Explain the use of bioinformatics tools in various aspects of plant pathology
  • Analyze DNA sequences of various plant pathogens
  • Explain the evolutionary history of plant pathogens
  • Predict the structure and function of effector proteins and pathogenesis-related proteins
  • Estimate the level of various gene expressions in host-pathogen interaction
  • Evaluate the current technologies for performing next-generation sequencing
Detailed syllabus
  • Introduction to bioinformatics. Pathogen identification based on sequence homology: preparation of sequence assembly, searching the main repositories of sequence information, and identify similar sequences in the databases. Creating sequence pair-wise alignment and multiple sequences alignments.
  • Phylogenetics of plant pathogens: the neighbor-joining method and maximum likelihood method.
  • Meta-genomics to assess species diversity in mixed infections, molecular resistance of a plant, and virulence properties of a pathogen.
  • Pathogen effector proteins and pathogenesis-related proteins: Protein motifs and profile analysis. Exploring conserved regions within protein families. Methods used to determine a protein’s structure. Methods for determining protein-protein interactions.
  • Gene expression analysis in host-pathogen interaction: technologies for creating expression data and for extracting information from microarray hybridizations or RNA-seq reads.
Teaching and Learning Methods/Activities Lectures, practical, tutorial discussion, take-home assignments, seminar and oral presentation by students, E – Learning and online based teaching.
Evaluation Theory: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Practical: In-course assessment(s): 30%, End of Course Examination: 70%

Overall marks = (6*MT+4*MP)/10

MT –  Marks for theory component, MP –  Marks for practical component

Recommended References

 

  • Momand, J., McCurdy, A., Heubach, S. and Warter-Perez, N. (2016). Concepts in Bioinformatics and Genomics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Keith, J. M. (2017). Bioinformatics, Volume I: Data, Sequence Analysis, and Evolution. 2nd ed. New York: Springer Science Business Media.
  • Mukhopadhyay, C. S., Choudhary, R. K. and Iquebal M. A.(2017). Basic Applied Bioinformatics. UK: Wiley–Blackwell.
  • Selzer, P. M., Marhöfer, R. J. and Oliver Koch, K. (2018). Applied Bioinformatics. 2nd ed. USA: Springer International Publishing.
BOA413M3: Conservation and Management of Plant Biodiversity
Course code BOA413M3
Course title Conservation and Management of Plant Biodiversity
Credit Value 03
Core/Elective Elective
Prerequisite Nil
Hourly Breakdown Theory Practical Field visit Independent Learning
45 10 95
Objective/s ·         Provide knowledge on plant biodiversity and natural resources

·         Impart knowledge on conservation and management of plant biodiversity and natural resources of Sri Lanka

Intended learning outcomes ·         Explain the need of conservation and management of plant biodiversity

·         Design effective action plans for the management of plant biodiversity with special reference the endangered plant species, mangroves, forests, coastal vegetation.

·         Reframe sustainable management systems to conserve natural plant diversity and related ecosystems

Course contents ·         Plant biodiversity: Natural vegetation, forest resources, grass land, endemic and endangered species, coastal ecosystems and mangroves – special reference to Sri Lanka.

 

·         Threat to the plant biodiversity: natural hazards and exploitation of plant biodiversity due to human intervention, environmental pollution, urbanization, deforestation, sand mining, current coastal livelihood approaches, emission of gases, greenhouse effect, overconsumption, soil erosion, and degradation of ecosystems.

 

·         Conservation and management: Laws and implementation, Environmental protection act, integrated conservation and management projects and plans, sustainable utilization of existing plant biodiversity and ecosystems, reforestation, organized garbage disposal projects, conservation of plant genetic resources, policies and implementation for sustainable use.

Teaching learning Methods/Activities Lectures, tutorial discussion, take-home assignments, field based studies, E – Learning and online based teaching.
Evaluation/Assessment Strategy In-course assessment(s): 30%,

End of Course Examination: 70%

Recommended References David and Hawksworth (2010). Management and the Conservation of Biodiversity. Springer Netherlands.

 

Eddy van der Maarel, (2013). Vegetation Ecology. John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

 

Hanum, F., Mohamad. A. L., Hakeem. K. R., Ozturk. M. (2013). Mangrove Ecosystems of Asia Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

 

Pullaiah P. (2015). Plant Biodiversity Conservation and   Management.Daya Publishing House.